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  • Husband's Resources, Power Motive, and Physical Violence Against Married Women in Hong Kong

Husband's Resources, Power Motive, and Physical Violence Against Married Women in Hong Kong

A Mediational Analysis of Resource Theories in a Chinese Society

Adam Ka-lok Cheung


English , 2012/01 Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, CUHK

Tags: Hong Kong Studies, Sociology

215 x 140 mm , 37pp ISBN : 978-962-441-222-2

  • US$3.00


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Husband-to-wife violence is the most common form of gender-based violence and is much more prevalent than many other forms of interpersonal violence. Resource theories argue that men with few resources, or fewer resources than their wife, would have a stronger motive for desiring more power in the relationship. Therefore, they are more likely to perpetrate violence against their partner. However, the role of the power motive in connecting resources and domestic violence has seldom been empirically examined in a Chinese context. Using couple-level data from a household survey in Hong Kong (N?=?871), the present study confirms that a couple's income difference and the husband's full-time employment status exert an indirect effect on husband-to-wife violence through the husband's power motive. Practitioners should not solely emphasize on the role of stress and anger in causing family violence, but also consider the family as a micro-power system where violence may be instrumental in the relationship.

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